The Northern Sea Route – A New Link in the Global Supply Chain

July 17th, 2014 5:04 pm Category: Global Supply Chain, Green Network, Network Design, Optimization Software, Supply Chain Agility, Supply Chain Improvement, Supply Chain Optimization, Sustainability, Transportation, by: Gene Ramsay

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Many of our activities at Profit Point are focused on helping clients in identifying and implementing changes that improve the efficiency of existing supply chain networks, ranging from planning to operations and scheduling.  In the short term we are usually trying to find ways to use existing capabilities more effectively, but as you look out over longer time horizons supply chains evolve to develop new links, and these must be considered as you plan.

One instance of this evolution was described by my colleague, John Hughes, who recently wrote about the rise of a “New Silk Road”– a rail network stretching through Western China, Kazakhstan, Russia and Belarus to Europe – used for transporting manufactured goods from Asia to meet demand in Europe.

But Asia has a complementary demand that must be met for their manufacturing systems to function, the demand for energy to power their factories and cities.  The growing worldwide demand for energy, and for faster routes to market, is opening up another new link in the global trade routes – the Northern Sea Route, a maritime route connecting Pacific ports with Europe via the Arctic.

Lawson Brigham, professor of geography and Arctic policy at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, was recently quoted on the arcticgas.gov website as saying “What’s really driving the Northern Sea Route is global commodity prices and natural resource development, particularly in Russia.”

The northern reaches of the earth are currently hotbeds of energy development, and much of the activity is focused on adding Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) production capacity.  Projects are on-line or in progress stretching from the North Slope in Alaska to the Yamal Peninsula in Siberia to Hammerfest in Norway.  The Northern Sea Route offers quicker shipments of many of these supplies to major Asian ports, shaving ten to twenty days off one-way transit times from Russia and Norway to ports in Korea and China, compared to routes through the Suez Canal.

Climate change has made these routes generally ice-free for several months of each year, and thus more cost effective, but ice-strengthened cargo ships, with icebreaker support, are still required to keep the route open in the colder months, thus driving up the costs.

Supply chain planning activities on a global scale will over time need to expand to consider the potential impact of these types of shipping options.  Keep an eye out for this and other new links in the global chain as they become available – change is inevitable.

 

For a more information on this route see articles like these:

http://www.arcticgas.gov/northern-sea-route-beckons-lng-shippers?utm_source=Arcticgas.gov+Distribution+List&utm_campaign=bed180a217-Northern+Sea+Route+beckons+LNG+shippers&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7eb428ef8a-bed180a217-407625618

http://arcticjournal.com/business/102/chinese-make-first-successful-north-sea-route-voyage

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